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Division of Community Property in a Divorce

DIVORCE AND DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PROPERTY

DIVIDING COMMUNITY PROPERTY

DIVIDING COMMUNITY PROPERTY

Understand the laws regarding community property when filing for divorce

If you live in Arizona and you are going through a divorce or preparing to proceed with a divorce, it would be in your best interest to learn about the property division laws.

An experienced Arizona divorce law attorney at My AZ Lawyers can explain to you what you need to know about the division of community property when getting a divorce, so you can be better informed and prepared to make decisions regarding your future and a successful divorce decree.

Having a knowledgable attorney on your side and understanding the definitions of community property according to the Arizona property division law may help disputes from arising in the divorce proceedings.

All of the property that was acquired by either spouse during the course of the marriage, with few exceptions, is considered the community property of both spouses.

If a spouse acquired property through a gift or inheritance, however, this may not fall into the community property category.  Also, any property that was acquired after the divorce petition was filed is the individual’s property.

Once a petition for divorced is served, community property maintains its status. A divorcing spouse cannot use funds in the marital bank account to acquire new property, then keep the new property as individual (it would still be considered a marital asset).

When both spouses involved understand which assets are considered comity property, an uncontested divorce may be more likely. 

An Arizona family law attorney experienced in divorce will help you to sort out any issues you might have with property division.  Sometimes real estate and certain property can be difficult to divide and you need someone who will be your advocate and assert your rights to achieve the best possible outcome for your case.